ASCHER, EBENALP & SEEALPSEE HIKE FROM WASSERAUEN

Wasserauen is quite simply a remarkable hiking hub for some of the best peaks in Switzerland. The regional mountain map is overflowing with options for trails that all seemingly intertwine, allowing you to plan your own route depending on your desired time and difficulty. We decided to begin our hike in Wasserauen and climb up through the forest to Ascher Restaurant and Ebenalp peak before descending down through the forest below the restaurant to reach Seaalpsee, which is the stunning Alpine lake that sits in the valley below all of the formidable peaks above).

In this blog post, I will describe this route and our experience but I will also provide the map that shows you how you can alter the hike to shorten it or lengthen it depending on your hiking ability and time available.

 

Hike Duration: 4 hours

Hike Difficulty: Some steep climbs. No technical climbing or rock climbing. The path the whole way. Moderate overall. Kids were on the trail.

Hike Incline: Wasserauen 876m to Ebenalp 1644m.

 

GETTING TO WASSERAUEN

Wasserauen is in the north-east of Switzerland near the Liechtenstein border. Luckily, Switzerland is a relatively small country so you can reach the town of Wasserauen from most places including Zurich (2-hr journey by car). There is no major city nearby with journeys of 2+ hours from Chur, Lucerne, and Bern to reach Wasserauen. 

Most trains will first run to Gossau station and then transfer to Wasserauen station, which is close enough to the trailhead to begin walking from the moment you disembark the train.

 

TRAILHEAD INSTRUCTIONS AND EBENALP/SEEALPSEE HIKING MAP

When you arrive at Wasserauen, you will find yourself in a giant parking lot. A damn pretty parking lot but you will soon realize, this is not an off-the-beaten-path trail. There is a cable-car to Ebenalp that I will detail later, which means you get a lot of tourists rather than hikers, which is fine but we are here to detail the hike.

From the Alpen Rose hotel, walk away from the Seealpsee direction and away from the parking lot. The trail is on the left side next to a wooden house and heads directly up into the forest.

Josh passing the wooden cabin at the trailhead, which leads into the forest.

The map below shows the entire hiking region near Wasserauen. As you can see there are so many different connecting trails, which makes it a great spot for all different abilities and schedules. I will detail how we created our route then offer an alternative or two.

  • Begin in Wasserauen
  • Hike up the hill through the forest to Bommen
  • Arrive to Ascher Cliff Restaurant
  • Head up the cliff to Wildkirchli to see the Church and Cave
  • Continue up the hill to Ebenalp Viewpoint
  • Continue further to Fuessler Viewpoint
  • Return back past Wildkirchli and arrive back to Ascher
  • Hike down through the forest to the edge of Seealpsee
  • Take a lap around Seealpsee (Alpine Lake)
  • Return to Wasserauen

An epic alternative would be to include Meglisalp in your route or head all the way up to Schafler.

 

REACHING BOMMEL

The trail begins through the forest with a very steep set of switchbacks. Within minutes we were completely covered in sweat as the Swiss summer hit us with full force. The forest was beautiful with towering trees giving us some much-needed shade and an incredible scene as hikers in the distance ducked in and out of the tree trunks. The incline was relentless for a good 20-30 minutes before we finally reached the open field atop the hill.

The beautiful forest on the hill up to Bommel.

As we left the forest and entered the farming fields above, we were welcomed with our first view of the surrounding mountains. With lactic acid in the legs and epic mountain vistas in all directions, we sat down and took it all in while re-hydrating.  The trail would flatten out for a while as we made our way through Bommel to the sound of the bells, ringing from the necks of the local cows.

Drink station with a view.

 

And the day had only just begun.

 

Moving up towards Bommel.

 

Through the farm fields of Bommel.

 

Meeting the locals in Bommel.

 

HIKING TO ASCHER CLIFF RESTAURANT

After making our way through the fields of Bommel, we began another ascent up the hill towards the Ascher Restaurant. With some shade from the mountain, we took a reprieve from the harsh Swiss sun while enjoying the mountain-range to the left of the Wasserauen valley.

The ascent to Ascher Cliff Restaurant.

 

The trail up to Ascher Cliff Restaurant with beautiful views over the valley.

 

Rounding the final corner before we reach Ascher.

 

We rounded the final corner before the valley opened up and right there, perched precariously on the cliff-side was the Ascher Cliff Restaurant. This restaurant is rather famous due to its incredibly scenic position. We thought it might be quite expensive given it is Switzerland and this was an in-demand spot but to our surprise, it was on par with average cafe prices from the city. We chilled out at the restaurant for half an hour enjoying a coffee amongst other hikers, families and trail runners.

It is of note to mention that you can take the cable car up to Ebenalp and then walk the short way down to Ascher Cliff Restaurant if you aren’t intending to do much hiking but still want to enjoy this iconic restaurant location.

Ascher Cliff Restaurant

 

VISITING WILDKIRCHI AND THE CAVES

Once you finish your last sip of coffee at the Ascher Cliff Restaurant, you can head up the stairs towards the church and the caves. Inside one of the caves are pews and a shrine within the church. To my surprise, an actual service is held here once a month, which would be quite the pilgrimage for many who make the journey.

Beyond the church are some caves you need to walk through to make it to Ebenalp. Inside the caves are lights showing you points of interest with placards explaining important parts about the caves, such as the fact that bears used to live inside.

Wildkirchi: The Church

 

Inside the mysterious caves

 

HIKING UP TO EBENALP

After passing through the caves, you are just about at the Ebenalp viewpoint. However, you still need to push through a little more incline to make it up to Ebenalp, which sits at 1,644m above sea-level. At the viewpoint, you will find a restaurant and several small buildings selling souvenirs. We took this chance to sit down on the benches, take the whole scene in and even send the drone out for a scouting mission.

A drone shot looking back at Ebenalp Viewpoint

 

A drone view of Seealpsee while flown from Ebenalp

 

HIKING DOWN FROM EBENALP TO SEEALPSEE

You can continue on to Fuessler Viewpoint and beyond if you wish or you can make the journey back down to Ascher Cliff Restaurant, where you will find the path that leads you back down through the forest towards Seealpsee. It is supposedly about an hour from Ascher Cliff Restaurant to Seealpsee (Alpine Lake), but I think it took us about 45-minutes approximately.

You see a see that points to the right and says Seealspee. Obviously, this is leading you to the lake so head up the hill (I know it seems tough after having climbed down but you are now only 10 minutes from the lake). Heading into Seealpsee is just absolutely with the mountains in the background towering over the pristinely still, alpine lake below.

The wondrous path to Seealpsee.

 

SEEALPSEE (ALPINE LAKE)

Seealpsee is an incredible spot. It was my first Swiss alpine lake and one I will never forget. It had an iconic row-boat moored to the banks of the lake, while the mountains reflected on the calm water. I couldn’t picture a more postcard-worthy finishing moment to this hike than to end up at Seealpsee.

Seealpsee and the iconic row-boat

 

We took a seat and enjoyed the final moments of light, which by that point was almost 8 pm. That may seem late to be out hiking but the sunset was scheduled for 8:40 pm as it was late July. The mountains began to slowly darken, leaven only the peaks illuminated in soft gold. Seealpsee proved to be a peaceful paradise for us to breathe in our adventures of the day and exhale any stresses we had brought with us.

 

An aerial of the lake and the golden-tipped peaks during sunset.

A small hotel/restaurant called the ‘Berggasthaus Forelle’ sits on the side of the lake, hidden by the trees. Here you can enjoy a sunset beer and or dinner. It would be a beautiful place to stay and many of the diners looked at us pretty pleased with themselves that they weren’t still out hiking at 8:30 pm.

Seealpsee reflections during golden hour.

 

 

We then made the final trek back to Wasserauen, which took about 30-40 minutes on a flat, paved road as the last light slowly faded as did our tired bodies.

I can’t recommend this trail enough and want to return personally to hike to Meglisalp and the other peaks in the region.

 

EBENALP CABLE CAR

The cable car station is located near the parking lot and you can buy a one-way or return ticket. Here you can use your Swiss Half-Fare Card so you only need to pay half of the 20 CHF (19 USD) ticket. The cable car runs every 15 minutes from 7:30 am to 6 pm. To be sure of the current operating times you can check here.

 

BEST WAYS TO GET AROUND WITH TRANSPORT IN SWITZERLAND

In Switzerland, the most popular form of transport is the train (and sometimes bus). It always arrives on time, is comfortable, efficient and covers almost all parts of the country. It’s damn good and one of the best public transport systems in the world. But it’s not cheap. A one-way ticket for a 1.5-hour journey can quickly rise to 70 USD. The best option is to buy a 3-day, 8-day or 15-day pass with the Swiss Travel System Pass, which gives you unlimited train rides during that period. It will pay itself off very quickly and makes the train (and bus) travel very convenient without requiring you to buy a ticket each time. I used this myself and used the trains and buses for almost my whole time in Switzerland. To head to the page where you can book your Swiss Travel Pass online you can click HERE and select how many days you would like to purchase the pass for.

The other option (Which I also purchased) was the Swiss Half-Fare Card, which gives you half-price tickets on all transport including buses and trains. This ticket lasts for a month and is much cheaper than the full pass obviously but will pay itself off in a matter of a few days as we quickly found out! To visit the page where you can book your Swiss Half-Fare Card you can click HERE and select the date you want it to start.

The other option is renting a car. After our first few expensive train tickets, we started to think this might be the better option and to our surprise, the train can often be far more expensive than renting a car in Switzerland. For example one day we went from Zurich to hike Mount Pilatus and back to Zurich and our total train tickets for four people was $300 USD. The car rental per day was $90 USD. If you are in a group of two (definitely three) or more, I highly suggest renting a car if you are covering a lot of ground as it will give you scheduling freedom and likely be cheaper as we found.

 

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